Books for My College Classes Fall 2020

As school restarts for me this month online, I always look forward to the books I’m assigned to read. Since most of my classes this semester are historical, I have a lot of amazing looking historical nonfiction books to read. One of my classes, Survey to Communication Research, does not require any books, but for the rest I have at least one book and I thought it would be interesting to share them with you.

American History to 1877

Of the People: A History of the United States, Volume I: To 1877, with Sources

Title: Of the People: A History of the United States Volume I to 1877 by James Oakes, Michael McGerr, etc.

Publication: 2018 (original 2009)

Pages: 768

This is the only book required for this course, and it looks like a pretty easy textbook, with a lot of maps and pictures. Definitely not very dense with a lot of condensed information. I will hold my judgement on whether I like this book or not by the end of the semester, but so far I like it.

Intro to Historical Analysis

The French Revolution and Human Rights: A Brief Documentary History

Title: The French Revolution and Human Rights: A Brief Documentary History edited by Lynn Hunt

Publication: 1996

Pages: 150

This is one of five (yes, five!) book required for this course. It is a collection of primary documents from the era around the French Revolution examining different philosophers’ rationalizations of human right in France. These philosophers include Voltaire and Marquis de Lafayette (and many authors I’ve never heard of). I’m excited to examine this book, especially in the context of history.

Envisioning America: English Plans for the Colonization of North America

Title: Envisioning America: English Plans for the Colonization of North America 1580-1640 edited by Peter C. Mancall

Publication: 2016

Pages: 192

This book is mostly a collection of primary sources of different settlers and explorers who came to America after its “founding” by Christopher Columbus. The only name I actually recognize in this book is Sir Walter Ralegh who sailed under the favor of Queen Elizabeth the I. It looks more like diaries of these people on their observations of early America.

American Scripture: Making the Declaration of Independence

Title: American Scripture: Making the Declaration of Independence by Pauline Maier

Publication: 1997

Pages: 336

According to the back of this book, it is a historical nonfiction taking a look at the making of the Declaration of Independence, but stripping away the idealism associated with it and instead looking at both the founding fathers’ goals for it and its historical context. This book looks really interesting to me and I look forward to diving into it.

A Manual for Writers of Research Papers, Theses, and Dissertations, Ninth Edition: Chicago Style for Students and Researchers

Title: A Manual for Writers: Of Research Papers, These, and Dissertations revised by Wayne C. Booth, Gregory G. Colomb, etc.

Publication: 2020

Pages: 480

I’m really excited for this book more as a reference in the future than to thoroughly read this semester. I always love learning more about how to write, especially more formal, scholarly papers, because honestly college does a shitty job (forgive my language) in teaching students to actually write critically. But this book looks great because it teachers how to do research, quote formal documentation, and use Chicago style of referencing.

Facing East from Indian Country: A Native History of Early America

Title: Facing East from Indian Country: A Native History of Early America by Daniel K. Richter

Publication: 2003 (original 2001)

Pages: 336

This book takes a look at the power and history of Indians around the foundation of America. I’m really excited to read this because I confess I don’t know much about the individual Native American tribes or their history/tradition. And finally, this is the last book I’m assigned for this class. If I’m required to read all these books this semester, I may be a bit overwhelmed. Luckily, I do love reading.

Intermediate Chinese I

Integrated Chinese 2 Textbook Simplified

Title: Integrated Chinese 2 Textbook Simplified Characters

Publication: 2017

Pages: 417

This is my second year of Chinese, and I’m excited and nervous for more challenging vocabulary. I really enjoyed the first year of this textbook and its accompanying workbook because it takes a look at real dialogue and then breaks it down to new vocabulary and grammar. However, I found last year challenging remembering everything so I know that this year I want to spend more time focusing on studying Chinese daily.

Integrated Chinese 2 Workbook Simplified (Chinese and English Edition)

Title: Integrated Chinese 2 Workbook Simplified Characters

Publication: 2017

Pages: 226

This is the accompanying workbook which goes along with the lesson book. I’m not sure how this is going to work with being online and trying to complete these pages but be unable to turn them in in person to my teacher, but we’ll see. If this workbook is like the last one, it’s very challenging but also a great practice.

Dead Seas Scrolls and the Xian Origin

The first book I am required to get for this class, which I already owned, is the Bible. My professor said any Bible works as long as it has the Old and New Testament in it. I guess this makes sense, as the Dead Seas Scrolls are parts of the Bible.

The Dead Sea Scrolls

Title: The Dead Sea Scrolls A New Translation translated by Michael Wise, Martin Abegg Jr., and Edward Cook

Publication: 2005 (original 1962)

Pages: 688

This is probably my most excitint book for this semester. It’s an entire translation of the Dead Sea Scrolls, which will be super dense and hard to read (especially since we’re missing a lot of the actual scrolls) but well worth the effort!

The Dead Sea Scrolls and the Hasmonean State

Title: The Dead Sea Scrolls and the Hasmonean State by Hanan Eshel

Publication: 2008

Pages: 224

This book examines the historical and political context around the original creation of the Dead Sea Scrolls. It looks really interesting, especially since I don’t know much about this era and place in history. In fact, I’m pretty sure this is the class I’m most excited about in general.

So there are the books I’m assigned to read this semester. Do any of them look interesting to you? Let me know your thoughts down in the comments, follow my blog for more musings and, as always,

Best wishes in your life full of adventure,

Madame Writer

6 thoughts on “Books for My College Classes Fall 2020

  1. I took both semesters of American History. I am good with remembering dates and events. I read the book, but didn’t need to study hard to make a good grade. The other history books look interesting. Will you write reviews on them?

    Liked by 1 person

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